IJIMT 2011 Vol.2(6): 471-476 ISSN: 2010-0248
DOI: 10.7763/IJIMT.2011.V2.178

Regret Model for Arbitration: Predicting the Outcome

Abdulla Galadari and Hamad Al Hammadi

Abstract—Going through arbitration has many costs, both tangible and intangible. Going to arbitration may also result in the severance of a mutual relationship between a contractor and a client. It may result that the contractor would lose potential future profits by being barred from participating in future projects by the client. Therefore, it carries lots of risks associated with arbitration. Hence, even if the contractor is certain to win an arbitration case, the losses may outweigh the gains, resulting in regretting such a decision. This paper illustrates a mathematical multivariate matrix to determine the best decision to be taken considering a regret theory approach. A challenge for corruption in the decision-making process for arbitration is also highlighted based on a corrupt system of rewards within the organization for the pursuit of claims. Using the regret model reduces or eliminates possible decisions borne by a corrupt system. An example is provided to illustrate the difference between a typical decision theory approach and regret theory.

Index Terms—Arbitration, Construction contracts, Decision theory, Dispute, Regret modelling, Risk, Settlement.

A. Galadari is an adjunct faculty with the Higher Colleges of Technology and the American University in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (e-mail:aigaladari@gmail.com).H. Al-Hammadi is a graduate student with Masdar Institute of Science and Technology in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (e-mail:hamad.alhammadi@gmail.com).

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Cite: Abdulla Galadari and Hamad Al Hammadi, "Regret Model for Arbitration: Predicting the Outcome," International Journal of Innovation, Management and Technology vol. 2, no. 6, pp. 471-476, 2011.

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